Careers in aesthetic medicine

In the ever-evolving field of aesthetic medicine, understanding the different career options and qualifications required is essential for those wishing to make their way in it. This article provides an overview of the multiple career paths, highlighting the roles, appropriate training, and regulatory standards essential for success in this specialized sector.

Who can practice aesthetic medicine?

Medical doctors

In the vast majority of cases, only medical doctors are authorized to perform aesthetic medical procedures.

This is because botulinum toxin, for example, is considered a drug by the authorities and therefore subject to medical prescription.

Hyaluronic acid, on the other hand, is considered a subcutaneous implantable medical device, and is therefore reserved for use by medical doctors only. Aestheticians are not authorized to administer subcutaneous treatments.

Many aesthetic medical procedures are delegated medical procedures under the prescription and supervision of a medical doctor.

But of course, being a medical doctor is not enough to practice aesthetic medicine. As it happens, this is not a medical specialty, as are dermatology, general medicine, plastic surgery, ophthalmology, radiology and gynecology. As such, doctors wishing to provide aesthetic medical procedures must undergo training appropriate to their practice. At present, there is a wide range of theoretical and practical training courses, but in the vast majority of cases, doctors learn on the job through workshops organized by the industry.

This situation is clearly inadequate in view of the high demand and the responsibility that doctors have towards the public. That’s why comprehensive, evidence-based, ethical training programs have emerged, with a focus on harmonious treatment. For example, the SAMBA Academy was created to meet the need for training doctors in aesthetic medicine.

The nurses

As a general rule, nurses are not allowed to perform aesthetic medical procedures. Of course, they can do so in the same way as a beautician, under the responsibility of a doctor, but without being able to perform hyaluronic acid or Botox injections, except in certain countries.

In England and Scandinavia, nurses have the right to perform medical procedures for aesthetic purposes, including injections. But they are subject to extremely thorough training and certification. These courses are very costly, far more so than courses for medical doctors such as SAMBA.

The beauticians

Aestheticians have no right to perform medical procedures for aesthetic purposes. They are not allowed to use class 4 medical lasers, or to inject botulinum toxin, hyaluronic acid, calcium hydroxyapatite (Radiesse) or poly lactic acid (Sculptra, Lanluma).

This does not mean, however, that estheticians do not have the right to perform many aesthetic procedures that are perfectly effective and meet a demand that complements those of aesthetic medicine.

These beauty professionals are to be distinguished from “fake injectors” who are not only outlawed, but do not comply with any safety and hygiene standards, putting patients’ physical integrity at risk. These ” fake injectors ” represent a major threat to the public and to the profession. It is the responsibility of all players in the industry to actively combat these ” fake injectors “.

2 types of career

What to look for before taking the plunge

– The quality and credibility of our teaching staff, through their publications in scientific journals and their participation in internationally renowned conferences such as IMCAS and AMWC.

– Key Opinion Leader (KOL) status for major industry players such as Galderma, Allergan, IBSA, Merz, Teoxane and Vivacy. Their personal successes through clinics and projects.

– In addition, it’s important to have an idea of the shared values of the teachers to make sure they match the values you want to convey in your practice.

– Then, of course, the composition of the courses and the topics covered.

– Then there’s the way the courses are delivered: face-to-face, distance learning, or a hybrid of distance learning and face-to-face.

You should also pay attention to knowledge assessment. Give preference to continuous assessment of knowledge by multiple-choice questions.

– Make sure content is evidence-based, consensus content. That this content is current and not taken from publications that are more than twenty years old.

– Finally, pay attention to the level of recognition of these courses. Local recognition is often insufficient, and European recognition is a guarantee of quality and reliability for your training.

The challenge of credible, recognized training is twofold:

– the first: the acquisition of basic concepts in aesthetic medicine.

– The second is to prove your training to insurance companies, in the event of a dispute with a dissatisfied patient or side-effects linked to your practice, but also to demonstrate your seriousness and mastery to your patients.

Once you’ve completed your basic training, the industry offers a wide range of masterclasses with the industry, at your initial training center or by enrolling in other complementary training courses that will support your progress, growth and mastery of aesthetic medicine.

Setting up a private practice

A classic career path, the doctor or medical student is attracted to aesthetic medicine. Once the prerequisite of a medical doctor’s diploma has been validated, he can concentrate on choosing a training program that will meet the requirements of his practice.

Working as a salaried employee in an aesthetic medicine center or clinic

The aesthetic medicine market is in the process of segmenting and maturing, and with it we are seeing the emergence of chains and brands that bring together a number of aesthetic medicine centers or clinics. The demand for qualified doctors is growing rapidly, as it is essential for the smooth running of these clinics. The most sought-after profiles will be juniors, as they will be able to progress within the structure and immerse themselves in the company’s culture. What’s more, they’ll be able to assimilate the brand’s own protocols and processes. Recruiters are therefore going to be very vigilant about the candidate’s personality and qualifications. Candidates who have already validated their diplomas in aesthetic medicine will be given preference over those who have not. Today, a diploma such as the SAMBA diploma is highly valued by these structures. To find out more about this diploma, click here.

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Careers in aesthetic medicine

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